» The Tank
January 11th, 2016
Horkheimer
Max Horkheimer and The Sociology of Class Relations
By , (Boston University), (Emory University), (School of the Art Institute of Chicago), (UIC) and (The University of Vermont)

In the fall of 1943 Max Horkheimer composed multiple drafts of an essay entitled “On the Sociology of Class Relations.” The essay was intended for inclusion in the collaborative project with Theodor W. Adorno which came to be called The Dialectic of Enlightenment. One indication that the essay was crucial to their project was that Horkheimer solicited several responses to the working drafts including comments from Franz Neumann and Herbert Marcuse (on the East coast) and Friedrich Pollock and Adorno (in Los Angeles with Horkheimer).

Here for the first time is Horkheimer’s original essay in full and in its original English-language format plus five contemporary responses.

January 11th, 2016
The Age of the Crisis of Man
By (Case Western Reserve University), (Concordia University), (The New School), (University of Missouri) and (Southern Methodist University)

Both as intellectual and as literary history — as an account of the relation between the two in the mid-20th century and an attempt to reimagine the relation between the two in the early 21st century — Mark Greif’s The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933-1973 (Princeton University Press, 2015) is an important and original book. We asked a number of critics working in related areas to say what they thought about it, and Greif to respond.

June 22nd, 2015
Cronan cover
Against Affective Formalism: Matisse, Bergson, Modernism
By (National Gallery of Art), (The Ohio State University), (Emory University), (University of Illinois, Chicago), (Case Western Reserve University) and (Emory University)

Let me be clear, the problems I raise do not stem from a dissatisfaction with the way October authors repeat a kind of party line. In fact, I envy the unity and consistency of the resolve and of course their massive impact on the discipline (what is there, politically speaking, besides anti-hierarchy in the humanities?). My point is that the basic set of claims shared by many of these authors is mistaken.

March 14th, 2014
Antinomies_of_Realism_CMYK_300
Jameson’s The Antinomies of Realism
By (Princeton University), (Université de Franche Comté), (Universidade Estadual de Campinas), (Yeshiva University), (University of South Carolina) and (Texas Tech University)

This brings us back to Jameson and realism. Jameson continues to insist upon the idea of meaninglessness in Zola’s abundant descriptive lists; in referring to the copious description of the cheeses in the shop in Le Ventre de Paris, he speaks of “their veritable liberation from meaning in all their excess.” The pungent cheese passage indeed shows a “delirious multiplicity,” but the cheeses are far from being meaningless or “autonomous.” For what does it mean when it is said that an element of a literary work is meaningless? Can it be true that multiplicity or excess leads to meaninglessness? Or that the moment something exists in the bodily realm, it does not signify?

March 14th, 2014
Jameson Responds
By (Duke University)

What needs to be understood about my distance from those debates around affect polemics is that I still believe in the binary opposition, and am in that sense, I guess, some kind of structuralist Hegelian, or better still, that I include Hegel in Marx and structuralism in the dialectic. “Oppositions without positive terms”: such was Saussure’s great formula, his reinvention of the dialectic on a linguistic basis. Concepts do not exist in isolation, they are defined by their opposites: it is a dialectical lesson as well as a structuralist one, and in the best of worlds the latter should lead back to the former, which it reinvents in a new and contemporary way.

September 13th, 2013
Writing Against Time
Writing Against Time
By (Case Western Reserve University), (Princeton University), (The Johns Hopkins University), (Kenyon College), (NYU) and (Stanford University)

I don’t notice the sky on my way to work. I couldn’t say what colors my neighbors’ flowers are. In fact, I’m not even sure that they have flowers…But if, as Scarry argues, the flowers in books are in constant danger of dying for want of the solidity of real flowers, then what is killing the real flowers? And what is the medicine? The analysts of literary effects from Edmund Burke through Viktor Shklovsky, from Scarry to the latest cognitive critics, have been distracted by formal features, structures, and techniques. The sickness of literary flowers may be a problem for literary technique. The sickness of living flowers is a problem for philosophy. And this philosophy, as I will argue, has been the constant practice of a literature that doesn’t want to imitate life, but to transform it.

March 21st, 2013
Beuys, 7000 Oaks
Ecological Art: What Do We Do Now?
By (University of Toronto), (University of Richmond), (University of Guelph), (The University of Melbourne), (College of William & Mary) and (College of William & Mary)

Araeen’s “ecoaesthetics” insists that artists can and should make a difference in a world beset by environmental emergencies. He shows one way to move in this direction, by collectively implementing artistic ideas. Thinking of his polemic and of the many and various ecoart projects realized in recent years, we could be forgiven for wondering how much of a difference in this direction is “enough.”

September 17th, 2012
Adorno
Do We Need Adorno?
By (Emory University), (Case Western Reserve University), (UIC), (UIC), (School of the Art Institute of Chicago) and (Yeshiva University)

In one of his last interviews Michel Foucault famously said “As far as I’m concerned, Marx doesn’t exist.” What he meant was that “Marx” as an author was something largely fabricated from concepts borrowed from the eighteenth century, in particular the writings of David Ricardo. From Ricardo he derived his most crucial idea: the labor theory of value. As Clune explains, neoliberalism has made that theory obsolete and with it, Marxist analysis. For Foucault there were several Marxisms in Marx.

July 24th, 2012
A House Divided
A House Divided: American Art since 1955
By , (Smith College), (University of Pennsylvania), (College of William & Mary), (Southern Methodist University), (Princeton University) and (Princeton University)

What is the individual’s ongoing relation–how does she belong–to the national culture she may serve or criticize, but which has also helped shape her life and thought? This is the question embodied by Jasper Johns’s Flag. It has never been more relevant than in the new millennium–a political moment that is the backdrop to the themes of this book.

September 22nd, 2011
Izenberg-Being-Numerous
Being Numerous
By (UCI), (Case Western Reserve University), (Yale University), (UC Irvine), (University of Cambridge), (Pomona College) and (UC Berkeley)

Welcome to the opening of the Tank, into which we drop a published work or a work-in-progress (or some piece of one or the other) and see what happens when the water starts churning. In our first installment, Oren Izenberg steps into the water.

nonsite.org is an online, open access, peer-reviewed quarterly journal of scholarship in the arts and humanities.
nonsite.org is affiliated with Emory College of Arts and Sciences.
© 2017 all rights reserved. ISSN 2164-1668