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Nonsite.org is an online peer-reviewed journal of the humanities.
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Mathew Abbott is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Federation University Australia. His research draws on figures from modern European philosophy to engage contemporary debates in politics and aesthetics. His current focus is a project on the implications of self-consciousness for ecology and the place of our species in nature. Mathew is the editor of Michael Fried and Philosophy: Modernism, Intention, and Theatricality (Routledge 2018). He is the author of Abbas Kiarostami and Film-Philosophy (Edinburgh 2016) and The Figure of This World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology (Edinburgh 2014).
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Thomas Jessen Adams is Lecturer in History and American Studies in the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry and the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney.  He received his Ph.D. in American History at the University of Chicago in 2009 and taught for the next five years at Tulane University.  He is the author (with Steve Striffler) most recently of Working in the Big Easy: The History and Politics of Labor in New Orleans (Lafayette, La.: University of Louisiana Press, 2014) and is currently finishing a monograph entitled The Servicing of America: World, Value, and Inequality in the Modern United States.  His scholarly research and popular writing focus on the history and contemporary politics of political economy, labor, social movements, the Gulf South, and urbanity.
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V. Joshua Adams is visiting assistant professor of English at the University of Louisville. He received his PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Chicago, where he wrote a dissertation on impersonality and skepticism, and where he also edited Chicago Review. Translations of his have appeared in The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Italian Poetry and Atlanta Review, and are forthcoming in Those Who from afar Look Like Flies, an anthology of Italian poetry published by University of Toronto Press.
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Fabio Akcelrud Durão is Professor of Literary Theory at the State University of Campinas (Unicamp). He is the author of Modernism and Coherence: Four Chapters of a Negative Aesthetics (2008), Teoria (literária) americana (2011) and Fragmentos Reunidos (forthcoming in 2014), among others.
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Bridget Alsdorf is assistant professor in the Department of Art & Archaeology at Princeton University. She is the author of Fellow Men: Fantin-Latour and the Problem of the Group in Nineteenth-Century French Painting (Princeton University Press, 2012) and is currently at work on a book investigating the representation, in various media, of crowds and gawkers (badauds) in fin-de-siècle France. Articles on Félix Vallotton and Vilhelm Hammershøi are forthcoming in The Art Bulletin and Critical Inquiry, respectively.
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Charles Altieri teaches in the English department at UC Berkeley. His most recent books are The Particulars of Rapture (2002) and The Art of Modern Poetry. He has just finished a book on Wallace Stevens and the Phenomenology of Value.
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Mariola V. Alvarez is currently an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Rice University. She is working on a book project, Neoconcretism and Brazilian Modernism, 1954-1964, which presents a historical study of the Rio de Janeiro-based art and poetry group. Her work argues for the importance of studying Neoconcretism as an interdisciplinary, collaborative movement that was central to the production of a middle class national culture.
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Samuel Amadon is the author of Like a Sea, The Hartford Book, and the forthcoming Listener. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, Lana Turner, jubilat, Kenyon Review, and elsewhere. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of South Carolina, where he edits the poetry journal Oversound with Liz Countryman.
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Adrian Anagnost teaches modern and contemporary art, focusing on intersections of art and architecture in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe after 1960. Research interests include art and urbanism; museum architecture and exhibition design; artistic networks; performance and participation; and theories of “the social” in 20th- and 21st-century art. She is currently completing a book manuscript analyzing how theories of modernist architecture and urbanism permeated art of twentieth-century Brazil. Her current research project examines relationships between contemporary artists and institutions, focusing on the networked practices of Theaster Gates and Tania Bruguera.
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Stephanie Anderson is the author of two books of poetry, In the Key of Those Who Can No Longer Organize Their Environments (Horse Less Press) and Variants on Binding (forthcoming, National Poetry Review Press). She is a PhD candidate at the University of Chicago and edits the micropress Projective Industries.
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John Arena is an assistant professor of sociology at the City University of New York’s College of Staten Island. He is the author of Driven From New Orleans: How Nonprofits Betray Public Housing and Promote Privatization (University of Minnesota Press, 2012), which received the Oliver Cromwell Cox best book award from the Racial and Ethnic Minorities section and Paul Sweezy best book award from the Marxist section of the American Sociological Association.
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Jennifer Ashton teaches at UIC. She is the author of From Modernism to Postmodernism: American Poetry and Theory in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge UP 2005) and edited The Cambridge Companion to American Poetry Since 1945 (Cambridge UP 2013). She is currently finishing a new book, tentatively titled Poetry and the Price of Milk: Lyric, Politics, and the Market.
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Clive Barnett is Professor of Geography and Social Theory at the University of Exeter, UK. He is author most recently of The Priority of Injustice: Locating Democracy in Critical Theory (University of Georgia Press, 2017).
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Jami Bartlett is Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, where she works in nineteenth-century literature and culture, narrative theory, and the philosophy of language and mind. Her current book project is a study of referring in the realist novel.
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Jason Bartulis is completing his dissertation, “A Secular Form of Life: Art and Criticism, 1925-2011,” at the University of Chicago. There, he examines literary, musical and visual manifestations of secular naturalism in philosophical, religious and politico-economic contexts. More generally, his research interests include: American literature and the philosophy of art, mind, religion and science; African American intellectual history; the history and theory of photography and music, especially jazz; theories and representations of justice; and the history and theory of literary criticism.
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Sarah Beckwith is Katherine Everett Gilbert Professor of English at Duke University. She is the author of Christ's Body: Identity, Religion and Society in Medieval English Writing (London: Routledge, 1993); Signifying God: Social Relation and Symbolic Act in York's Play of Corpus Christi (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), and Shakespeare and the Grammar of Forgiveness (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011).
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R.M. Berry is Professor of English at Florida State University. He has published two novels, Frank (Chiasmus, 2005) and Leonardo’s Horse (Fiction Collective 2, 1997), as well as numerous short stories and scholarly essays.
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Daniel Biegelson is the author of the chapbook Only the Borrowed Light (VERSE) and Director of the Visiting Writers Series at Northwest Missouri State University as well as an editor for The Laurel Review. His poems have appeared in or are forthcoming from Denver Quarterly, DIAGRAM, FIELD, Grist, Interim, minnesota review, Salt Hill Journal, and Third Coast, among other places.
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Stanley Bill is a lecturer in Polish Studies at the University of Cambridge in the UK. He has published academic articles on Czes?aw Mi?osz and Bruno Schulz in both Polish and English-language journals, including forthcoming contributions to Slavic and East European Journal and Slavonic and East European Review, as well as an essay on Ukrainian immigrant workers in interwar Argentina in The Buenos Aires Review. He is currently developing a brand new program in Polish literature and culture at the University of Cambridge.
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Goran Blix is an Associate Professor of French and Italian at Princeton University. He studies the tradition of nineteenth-century French prose writing in the context of major historical and political developments. His interests include romanticism, realism, literary aesthetics, the historical imagination, and the relationship between democracy and literature. He has published articles on Balzac, Hugo, Michelet, Flaubert, Tocqueville, the Goncourt brothers, and Zola, among others, and his book on romantic historicism, From Paris to Pompeii: French Romanticism and the Cultural Politics of Archeology (2008), examines the impact of the nascent science of archeology on modern secular attitudes to death, memory, and immortality. He earned a B.A. in Literature from Harvard College (1996), a DEA from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (1998), and a Ph.D. in French from Columbia University (2003). He joined the Department of French and Italian at Princeton University in 2003.
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The sculptor Willard Boepple has exhibited widely since the early seventies. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of New York, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Storm King Art Center, The National Academy, The Fitz-William, The Hepworth Wakefield and numerous other public and private collections worldwide. He is represented by Lori Bookstein Fine Art in New York and Maddox Arts in London. He has served on the faculties of Bennington College and The Boston Museum School and has traveled extensively in Africa as a U.S. State Department Visiting Cultural Specialist. For twenty years he was chairman of the Triangle Artists’ Workshop in New York and serves on the boards of the Vermont Studio Center and the National Academy. He lives and works in New York and Vermont and frequently in the UK where he makes prints with Kip Gresham at the Print Studio, Cambridge.
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Amanda Boetzkes is the author of The Ethics of Earth Art (University of Minnesota Press, 2010), and co-editor, with Aron Vinegar, of Heidegger and the Work of Art History (Ashgate Press, forthcoming 2013). She is currently writing a book entitled, Contemporary Art and the Drive to Waste, which analyzes the use and representation of garbage in contemporary art, and more subtly, how waste as such is defined, narrativized and aestheticized in the age of global capitalism.
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Alan C. Braddock is the author of Thomas Eakins and the Cultures of Modernity (University of California Press, 2009) and co-editor, with Christoph Irmscher, of A Keener Perception: Ecocritical Studies in American Art History (University of Alabama Press, 2009). He is currently developing two new book projects: Gun Vision: The Ballistic Imagination in American Art and A Greene Country Towne: Philadelphia, Ecology, and the Material Imagination.
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Bertolt Brecht (10 February 1898–14 August 1956) was a German poet, playwright, theater director, and Marxist. This issue is devoted to his art and its politics.
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Sarah Brouillette is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at Carleton University.
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Nicholas Brown teaches in the departments of English and African American Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His current book project is Autonomy: The Historical Ontology of the Work of Art.
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Rex Butler is Professor of Art History at Monash University, Melbourne. He has written books on a number of theoretical (Baudrillard, Zizek, Deleuze) and literary (Borges) figures. He writes mainly about Australian art, and has recently completed a "non-national" history of Australian Art, tracing Australian art's connections with that of other countries and regions. He is currently working on a book, Stanley Cavell and the Arts, for Bloomsbury.
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Steve Buttes is Assistant Professor of Spanish and Culture Studies in the Department of International Language and Culture Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne. He is currently at work on a manuscript examining urban poverty and national identity in both realist and avant-garde works from the mid-twentieth century in Argentina, Chile, and Mexico. His work has appeared in Revista de Estudios Hispánicos and is forthcoming in the Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies.
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Gülru Çakmak is an Assistant Professor of Nineteenth-Century European Art at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her specialization is in nineteenth-century French painting, and she has recently embarked upon understanding sculpture. Following a Research Fellowship at the Henry Moore Institute, she co-organized the exhibition Polychromies: Surface, Light and Colour at Leeds Art Gallery, exploring color in sculpture from the late eighteenth century until the present. She collaborated with the Institute in organizing two research events in conjunction with this exhibition, “Environments of Polychromy: New Perspectives on Colour and Context for Display in Nineteenth-Century Sculpture,” and “Surface Tension: The Skin of Sculpture from 1800 to the Present.” She is currently at work on a book on Jean-Léon Gérôme and the crisis of history painting in France in the 1850s.
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Felicity Callard is Professor of Social Research and Director of the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research focuses on the psychological disciplines in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, and she is Editor-in-Chief of History of the Human Sciences. She is also writes on interdisciplinarity as a practice and epistemic object (see Rethinking Interdisciplinarity across the Social Sciences and Neurosciences, co-authored with Des Fitzgerald, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).
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Elisabeth Camp is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. She works in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of language, with special focus on various forms of "non-propositional" thought and speech, such as metaphor, sarcasm, maps, and animal cognition. She is currently working on a book about the notion of 'perspectives' in imagination.
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Jimmy Carter (1988) is an architect and writer whose practice delves into the breadth of architectural dissemination. Completing his MArch at the University of Melbourne in 2014, he co-founded DIS-cour.se, an organization aimed at promoting critical architectural discussion in Melbourne, Australia. Subsequently, working with groups such as MPavilion, Office of Strategic Spaces (Angel Borrego Cubero), and the Robin Boyd Foundation, his work has spanned architectural curation, film, and audio exploration. After arriving at UIC in 2016, he undertook an MA in Design Criticism. There, he was awarded the 2017 Schiff Foundation Critical Architectural Writing Fellowship by the Art Institute of Chicago, was published in journals such as Pidgin Magazine, Flat-Out, and DATUM, and was featured in the 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism. Other work will soon be published in MAS Context and Fresh Meat Journal.
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Abigail Chang (1990) is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at UIC. She completed a Masters in Architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, where she was awarded the Takenaka Fellowship, and her work was featured in the school publication and exhibition Platform. Abigail received a Bachelor of Arts in Architectural Studies with distinction and two minors in Asian languages and Spanish from the University of California, Los Angeles cum laude. She was awarded the Clifton Webb Fine Arts Scholarship, and her work was featured in the school exhibition Currents. Abigail has worked internationally in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Basel, and Tokyo for landscape architecture and architecture firms, including Herzog & de Meuron and SO – IL. She also contributed to the Chicago Architecture Biennial Make New History with Norman Kelley.
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Mark A. Cheetham is a professor of art history at the University of Toronto. He recently published Artwriting, Nation, and Cosmopolitanism in Britain: The “Englishness” of English Art Theory since the Eighteenth Century (Ashgate, British Art: Global Contexts series 2012). http://individual.utoronto.ca/MCHEETHAM/Mark_A._Cheetham/Welcome.html
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Robert Chodat is Professor of English at Boston University. He is the author of The Matter of High Words: Naturalism, Norms, and the Postwar Sage (Oxford University Press, 2017) and Worldly Acts and Sentient Things: The Persistence of Agency from Stein to DeLillo (Cornell University Press, 2008).
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Kevin Chua (PhD University of California, Berkeley) writes and teaches on the history of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century European art and Contemporary Asian Art at Texas Tech University. He is currently working on a book-length project on vitalism and painting in 1760s France.
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T. J. Clark is professor emeritus of art history at UC Berkeley. His new book, Heaven on Earth: Painting and the Life to Come, is just out in the US.
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Hollis Clayson is Professor of Art History and Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities at Northwestern University. She has published widely on Paris-based art practices, including the French capital’s large population of artists from elsewhere. Her books include Painted Love: Prostitution in French Art of the Impressionist Era (1991), Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life Under Siege (1870-71) (2002), and Is Paris Still the Capital of the Nineteenth Century? Essays on Art and Modernity, 1850-1900 (2016), co-edited with André Dombrowski. Her newest book (2019) is Paris Illuminated: Essays on Art and Lighting in the Belle Époque. Work on the Eiffel Tower will continue alongside a new study of Cézanne’s etchings.
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Michael W. Clune's most recent critical book is Writing Against Time (Stanford U P, 2013); his most recent creative work is Gamelife (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). He is a professor of English at Case Western Reserve University.
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J. D. Connor is an Assistant Professor of the History of Art and Film Studies at Yale. This essay is part of a history of tape recording called Voiceover: Taping, Transcription, and Reality from World War II to Watergate. His work on contemporary Hollywood includes The Studios after the Studios (forthcoming) and a project on Hollywood math.
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Harry Cooper is curator and head of modern art at the National Gallery of Art, Washington. Since joining the Gallery in February 2008, he has organized The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection: Selected Works and initiated a series of focus exhibitions in the Tower Gallery of the East Building on such artists as Philip Guston, Mark Rothko, and Nam June Paik. Before joining the Gallery in February 2008, Cooper served for ten years as the curator of modern art at the Harvard University Art Museums. There he organized a dozen exhibitions, including Frank Stella 1958 (2006), Medardo Rosso: Second Impressions (2003), and Mondrian: The Transatlantic Paintings (2001). Cooper lectured in Harvard's art history department on a wide variety of topics, from Paul Cézanne to abstract expressionism. He has also taught at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and Columbia University, New York,
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Danielle Coriale is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature, University of South Carolina. She specializes in Victorian literature and culture, and the history and philosophy of science, and has published essays in Nineteenth-Century Literature, SEL, and Nineteenth-Century Contexts. She is currently completing a book manuscript on zoological writing and Victorian fiction, which includes chapters on Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot.
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Diarmuid Costello is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick and a previous Chair of the British Society of Aesthetics. Between 2007-2011 he was Co-Director of the AHRC “Aesthetics after Photography” research project and co-edited three journal issues on photography: “Photography after Conceptual Art” (Art History, 32.5, 2009), “The Media of Photography” (The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 70:1, 2012) and “Agency and Automatism: Photography as Art since the 1960s” (Critical Inquiry, 38.4, 2012). His articles on aesthetics in post-Kantian German tradition and post-1960s art and theory have appeared in The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, The British Journal of Aesthetics and Critical Inquiry among others. He is currently working on two books: On Photography and Aesthetics after Modernism.
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Todd Cronan is Associate Professor of art history at Emory University. He is the author of Against Affective Formalism: Matisse, Bergson, Modernism (Univ. of Minnesota Press, 2014). His currently working on three books: Red Aesthetics considers what a Left artistic practice might look like (and not look like), focused on the interwar work of Rodchenko, Brecht and Sergei Eisenstein. A second book is a luxury edition of Minor White’s photographic daybooks called the Memorable Fancies (Princeton University Press, 2021). A third book on mid-century modern architecture, design, theory and politics in California focuses on the work of R. M. Schindler, Richard Neutra, Charles and Ray Eames, Buckminster Fuller, and Reyner Banham.
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Altemar da Costa Muniz is Associate Professor of History at the State University of Ceara - UECE (Brazil). His publications include: Dentaduras e Dentes de Leite: Politicos e Empresarios “Mundancistas” no Ceara,1978-1986 (2014) as well as Historia, Memoria, Oralidade e Cultura, ed. William J Mello, Zilda Lima and Altemar da Costa Muniz (2014); Historia, Memoria, Oralidade e Cultura, vol. II, ed. William J Mello, Zilda Lima and Altemar da Costa Muniz (forthcoming 2016).
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Whitney Davis is Professor of History & Theory of Ancient & Modern Art at UC Berkeley. He is the author of The Canonical Tradition in Ancient Egyptian Art (Cambridge, 1989), Masking the Blow: The Scene of Representation in Late Prehistoric Egyptian Art (1992), Pacing the World: Construction in the Sculpture of David Rabinowitch (Harvard, 1996); Drawing the Dream of the Wolves: Homosexuality, Interpretation, and Freud's "Wolf Man" Case (Indiana, 1996); Replications: Archaeology, Art History, Psychoanalysis (1996); Queer Beauty: Sexuality and Aesthetics from Winckelmann to Freud and Beyond (Columbia, 2010); and A General Theory of Visual Culture (Princeton, 2010). Currently he is working on Visuality and Virtuality: Images and Pictures from Ancient Egypt to New Media (a companion volume to A General Theory of Visual Culture) and Archaeologies of the Standpoint. Recent articles and talks have dealt with eighteenth-century British portraiture, neuroaesthetics and "radical pictoriality," the photography of Massimo Vitali, sexual-selection theory in Victorian aesthetics, and the historiography of frontality in prehistoric and ancient arts.
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Theo Davis is Professor of English at Northeastern University and the author of two books on nineteenth-century American literature: Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Whitman, and Dickinson (Oxford University Press, 2016) and Formalism, Experience, and the Making of American Literature in the Nineteenth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2007). Her current book project is an interdisciplinary inquiry into somatic awareness.
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Rachael DeLue’s area of specialization is the history of American art and visual culture, with particular focus on intersections between art and science and the history of African American art. She is the author of George Inness and the Science of Landscape (2004) and the co-editor, with James Elkins, of Landscape Theory (2008). She has also published on the French painter Camille Pissarro, Spike Lee's Bamboozled, Darwin and the visual arts, and the relationship between art writing and medical diagnosis in America circa 1900. Her most recent publications include an essay on art and science in America and an essay on beauty and stereotype in the work of the contemporary artists Kara Walker and Michael Ray Charles. She is currently writing a book about the twentieth-century American abstract painter Arthur Dove.
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Eugenio Di Stefano is Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature and Culture at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He has published articles on the discourse of human rights, the work of Roberto Bolaño, and Latin American painting in the Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies, Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, and MLN, respectively. He is currently working on a book manuscript titled The Vanishing Frame: Latin American Culture and Theory in the Postdictatorial Era.
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William Collins Donahue is Director of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the Keough School of Global Affairs and Cavanaugh Professor of the Humanities at the University of Notre Dame. He is a member of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures and Concurrent Professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Theater. He is the author of Holocaust as Fiction: Bernhard Schlink’s “Nazi” Novels and their Films and The End of Modernism: Elias Canetti’s Auto-da-Fé. Donahue is co-founder of the biennial German Jewish Studies Workshop and founding co-editor of the book series Nexus: Essays in German Jewish Studies (both with Martha Helfer).
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Florence Dore is associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill and current co-editor of the book series “Post45” (Stanford University Press). A member of Post45’s Steering Committee, she is working on a book about the rock novel. She recorded a rock album entitled Perfect City for the independent label Slewfoot Records in 2001, and, together with Will Rigby of the dB’s, she is making a second to be released in 2014.
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Peter Dorman is a faculty member in political economy at the Evergreen State College. He has published on a variety of topics in labor, public health, international development, international political economy and the intersection of economics and social theory. He is the author of Markets and Mortality: Economics, Dangerous Work and the Value of Human Life and a pair of introductory textbooks, Microeconomics: A Fresh Start and Macroeconomics: A Fresh Start. A book on climate change will be published next year. Dorman is also a regular contributor to the EconoSpeak blog.
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Susana Draper is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University. She is the author of Ciudad posletrada y tiempos lúmpenes: crítica cultural y nihilismo en la cultura de fin de siglo (Amuleto 2009) and Afterlives of Confinement: Spatial Transitions in Latin America (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012). She is currently working on another book project on cognitive democracy in the 1960s (Experiments in Freedom and Cognitive Democracy in Mexico: 1968 Other-Wise).
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Eva Ehninger is Professor of Modern Art at the Humboldt University. Her research interests include the history and theory of photography, theory and criticism of American modernist (1930-1970), colonialism and post-colonial theory (especially in India from the nineteenth century to the present), and media history of representation. She is the author of Vom Farbfeld zur Land Art. Ortsgebundenheit in der amerikanischen Kunst, 1950-1970 (Munich: Verlag Silke Schreiber, 2013) and is currently preparing two edited volumes and a new book project, Face and History: Photographic Norms of Representation.
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Mary Esteve is an associate professor at Concordia University in Montreal, where she teaches 19th, 20th, and 21st century American literature and culture.
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MARK FLETCHER is an illustrator and cartoonist. His work has been published in B O D Y, Boston Review and Poetry. Mark earned his BFA and BA in Art History from the University of Colorado. He lives in Colorado Springs.
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Lisa Florman is Professor of Twentieth-Century Art and Chair of the History of Art Department at Ohio State University. Her recent book, Concerning the Spiritual—and the Concrete—in Kandinsky’s Art (Stanford University Press, 2014), argues for the fundamentally Hegelian (and Kojèvian) context for Kandinsky’s art and writings. Other publications include Myth and Metamorphosis: Picasso’s Classicizing Prints of the 1930s (MIT Press, 2000), as well as essays on Clement Greenberg’s “Collage” and Leo Stenberg’s “The Philosophical Brothel.” Florman is currently serving as the twentieth-century field editor for books and conferences for caa.reviews.
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Michelle Foa is a 2018-2019 Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. and an Associate Professor in the Art Department of Tulane University. The author of Georges Seurat: The Art of Vision (Yale University Press, 2015), she is currently working on a book titled The Matter of Degas: Art and Materiality in Later Nineteenth-Century Paris.
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Danielle Follett is Associate Professor of English at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris. She is co-editor of The Aesthetics of the Total Artwork: On Borders and Fragments (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011) as well as numerous articles on nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and French literature, aesthetics, and music. She is currently completing a book on chance and contingency in literature, art and music.
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Megan French-Marcelin is a twentieth-century historian of urban policy and planning. Her work is primarily concerned with the origins of neoliberalism in the marriage of federal urban aid and local economic development. French-Marcelin has written about New Orleans, local politics, and socioeconomic inequality.
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Michael Fried is Academy Professor and Professor Emeritus of the Humanities. As an art historian he is best known for his trilogy of books on French pain­ting and art criticism from the middle of the 18th century through the advent of Manet and his generation in the early 1860s: Absorption and Theatrical­ity: Painting and Beholder in the Age of Diderot (1980), Courbet's Realism (1990), and Manet's Modernism, or, the Face of Painting in the 1860s (1996). But he is also the author of Realism, Writing, Disfiguration: On Thomas Eakins and Stephen Crane (1987), Menzel's Realism: Art and Embodi­ment in Nineteenth-Century Berlin (2002), Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before (2008), The Moment of Cara­vaggio (based on the Andrew W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts; 2010), Four Honest Outlaws: Sala, Ray, Marioni, Gor­don (2011), Flau­bert's "Gueuloir": On Madame Bovary and Salammbô (2012); Another Light: Jacques-Louis David to Thomas Demand (2014); After Caravaggio (2016); What Was Literary Impressionism? (2018) and Painting with Demons: The Art of Gerolamo Savoldo (2021). In addition his early art criticism is gathered in Art and Objecthood: Essays and Reviews (1998).
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M.D. Garral is assistant professor of philosophy at Baruch College. He has published on Hume, overmoralization, moral particularism, and most recently, "The Possibility of Agnosticism" in the International Philosophical Quarterly. His current project concerns the relationship between film and philosophy—though doting on Max, his five-month-old son, hasn't helped his cause.
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John Gibson is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Louisville. He is the author of Fiction and the Weave of Life (OUP, 2007) and is currently coediting, with Noël Carroll, The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature and editing The Philosophy of Poetry for OUP.
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Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe is a British New Abstractionist painter, art critic, theorist, and educator.
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Daniel Gonzalez is a Chicago area high school teacher. His research engages the relationship between pedagogy, public policy, the politics of literature and the autonomy of art. Daniel has previously served as the fiction editor and managing editor at Another Chicago Magazine.
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Marc Gotlieb is Director of the Williams Graduate Program in the History of Art, offered in collaboration with the Clark Art Institute.  His research encompasses French Romantic art, academic art, Orientalism, and related topics. The Deaths of Henri Regnault is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press in 2015.
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Grasso is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He specializes in American political development and institutions with a focus on inequality, public policy, law, and mass incarceration. He holds B.A.s in Political Science and History from Rutgers University and an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania.
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Mark Greif is Associate Professor of Literary Studies at the New School in New York, in its Eugene Lang College. He is a founding editor of n+1. His book The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933-1973 (Princeton) appeared in 2015 and will come out in paperback in October 2016. His next book, Against Everything, a collection of essays, will be published by Pantheon in September 2016.
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Cordula Grewe (IU Bloomington) specializes in European art of the long 19th century, with particular emphasis on questions of visual piety, word-image relationships, and aesthetics. Having published widely in this area she is currently pursuing two new research projects, Modern Theo-Aesthetics from Ingres to the Leipzig School and Portraiture as Performance from Emma Hamilton to Nicky Minaj.
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Paul Grimstad's writing has appeared in print and online in American Literary History, n+1, London Review of Books, Music and Literature, the New Yorker, The Paris Review, Raritan; and as chapters in the collections American Impersonal, Melville’s Philosophies and forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook to Edgar Allan Poe. His songs and original scores have been featured in Thirst St, Heaven Knows What, Happy Christmas, Frownland and other films.
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Dustin Guastella is a union staffer in Philadelphia and a member of the Democratic Socialists of America.
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Garry L. Hagberg is James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Aesthetics and Philosophy at Bard College. He is the author of Describing Ourselves: Wittgenstein and Autobiographical Consciousness (Oxford, 2008); Art as Language: Wittgenstein, Meaning, and Aesthetic Theory (Cornell, 1995); Meaning and Interpretation: Wittgenstein, Henry James and Literary Knowledge (Cornell, 1994). He is also the editor of Art and Ethical Criticism (Blackwell, 2008), co-editor of The Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Literature (Blackwell, 2009), and Editor of the journal Philosophy and Literature. He is presently completing a new book on the contribution literary experience makes to the formation of self-identity.
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Amy K. Hamlin is presently working on a book project provisionally titled Max Beckmann: Allegory and Art History in which she argues that the familiar characterization of Beckmann as a painter of modern allegories has as much to do with his art as it does the practice of art historical writing. She is the author of forthcoming articles on Beckmann as well as on Jasper Johns in, respectively, the anthology Methodological Studies of Christianity in the History of Art (2013) and the Journal of Art Historiography (December 2012). She is an Assistant Professor of art history at St. Catherine University.
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James Harold is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Weissman Center for Leadership and the Liberal Arts at Mount Holyoke College. He is the author of numerous articles in aesthetics (particularly the philosophy of literature), ethics, and metaethics. His work has appeared in Midwest Studies in Philosophy, American Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophia, Philosophy and Literature, and The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, among other places. His current work focuses on the relationship between aesthetic and moral judgments.
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Mallory Hasty is from Chicago. She currently lives in Malaysia, and works as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant.
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Charles Hatfield is Associate Professor of Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas. His first book, on the ideological underpinnings and political consequences of Latinoamericanismo, is forthcoming from the University of Texas Press in 2015.
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Charles W. Haxthausen is Robert Sterling Clark Professor of Art History at Williams College. His current and recent research has focused on the painters Paul Klee, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and Sigmar Polke, the filmmaker Fritz Lang, and the critics Carl Einstein and Walter Benjamin. Currently he is completing a book of translations of selected art theory and criticism by Carl Einstein.
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Genevieve Hendricks is an Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art History at Hollins University. Her published research has focused on correlations between painting and architecture during the 19th and 20th Centuries, examining individual artists and architects as well as collective efforts, and analyzing works including paintings, drawings, photographs, architectural plans, and buildings.
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Higgins is author of Fluxus Experience (University of California Press, 2002) and The Grid Book (MIT Press, 2009) and co-editor of with Douglas Kahn of Mainframe Experimentalism: Early Computing and the Foundations of Digital Art (University of California Press, 2012). She has received the UIC University Scholar Award, DAAD, Getty and Philips Collection Fellowships and is co-executor of the Estate of Dick Higgins and the Something Else Press.
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Andrew Hoberek is professor of English at the University of Missouri and author, most recently, of Considering Watchmen: Poetics, Property, Politics (Rutgers, 2014).
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Max Horkheimer (1895–1973) was a leader of the “Frankfurt School,” a group of philosophers and social scientists associated with the Institut für Sozialforschung (Institute for Social Research) in Frankfurt am Main. Horkheimer was the director of the Institute and Professor of Social Philosophy at the University of Frankfurt from 1930–1933, and again from 1949–1958. In between those periods he would lead the Institute in exile, primarily in America. As a philosopher he is best known for his work during the 1940s, including Dialectic of Enlightenment, co-authored with Theodor Adorno. Horkheimer's work in the 1930s formed the epistemological and methodological basis of Frankfurt School critical theory.
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Gordon Hughes is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art History at Rice University. He is the author of Resisting Abstraction: Robert Delaunay and Vision in the Face of Modernism (University of Chicago Press, 2014); co-editor, with Philipp Blom, of Nothing But the Clouds Unchanged: Artists in World War One (Getty Research Institute Press, 2014); and co-editor with Hal Foster of October Files: Richard Serra (MIT Press, 2000). He also recently published a catalogue essay on Richard Serra’s drawings with David Zwirner Books. His current book project, begun while a scholar Getty Research Institute in 2013, is titled Seeing Red: Murder, Abstraction, Machines.
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Phil Hutchinson is Senior Lecturer in Applied Philosophical Psychology, Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. Phil is currently pursuing 3 research projects: 1. Shame and Stigma in Healthcare, with particular focus on HIV and sexual health. 2. The Placebo Response, in which he critiques representationalist (including recent Bayesian) explanations and advocates ethnomethodological respecification of the placebo response. And 3. Contemporary E-cognition and other non-representational accounts of human responsiveness to loci of significance in the lifeworld and object-involving abilities. Phil has published work on Wittgenstein, the Philosophy of Social Science, Placebo, Emotion, Mind and Cognition.
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Oren Izenberg is an Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Being Numerous: Poetry and the Ground of Social Life (Princeton University Press, 2011), parts of his next book, on poetry and the philosophy of mind and action, have appeared in PMLA and nonsite.org.
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Fredric Jameson is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at Duke University. The author of numerous books, he has over the last three decades developed a richly nuanced vision of Western culture's relation to political economy. He was a recipient of the 2008 Holberg International Memorial Prize. He is the author of many books, including Postmodernism, Or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, The Cultural Turn, A Singular Modernity, The Modernist Papers, Archaeologies of the Future, Brecht and Method, Ideologies of Theory, Valences of the Dialectic, The Hegel Variations and Representing Capital.
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Simon Jarvis is Gorley Putt Professor of Poetry and Poetics in the Faculty of English at the University of Cambridge. Recent publications include Wordsworth's Philosophic Song (Cambridge University Press, 2007) and his works in verse, Dionysus Crucified: Choral Lyric for Two Soloists and Messenger (Grasp Press, 2011), F Subscript Zero (Equipage, 2007), The Unconditional: A Lyric (Barque Press, 2005) and the pocket epics 'Erlkoenig' (Chicago Review 55.2) and 'Dinner' (Cambridge Literary Review 4). He lives and works in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire.
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David Jenemann is Associate Professor at The University of Vermont where he teaches courses in film and television theory, critical theory, genre, and global cinema. He has published essays on the film theories of Gilles Deleuze and Theodor W. Adorno as well as on the poet and novelist Kenneth Fearing. His areas of research interest include film and television, critical theory, modernism, and twentieth century literature. He is currently working on a book on anti-intellectualism in America.
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Cedric Johnson is associate professor of African American Studies and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His teaching and research interests include African American political thought, neoliberal politics, and class analysis and race. His book, Revolutionaries to Race Leaders: Black Power and the Making of African American Politics (University of Minnesota Press, 2007) was named the 2008 W.E.B. DuBois Outstanding Book of the Year by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. Johnson is the editor of The Neoliberal Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, Late Capitalism and the Remaking of New Orleans (University of Minnesota Press, 2011). His writings have appeared in New Political Science, Monthly Review, New Labor Forum, SOULS, Journal of Developing Societies and In These Times. In 2008, Johnson was named the Jon Garlock Labor Educator of the Year by the Rochester Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO.
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Anton Jäger is a doctoral student at the University of Cambridge, working on the history of populism in the United States. His writings have appeared in magazines like Jacobin, The Guardian, Constellations, and the London Review of Books Blog. Together with Daniel Zamora he is currently at work on an intellectual history of basic income.
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Brian Kane is Associate Professor of Music at Yale University. He is the author of Sound Unseen: Acousmatic Sound in Theory and Practice (Oxford University Press, 2014).
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In her cameraless photography and sculpture, Farrah Karapetian probes questions of photographic representation and reality and explores the relationship between different mediums. Karapetian produces mainly large-scale photograms that reproduce pictures of current events and other found imagery, particularly scenes and signs of protest, abstracting their forms in order to allow viewers’ to introduce new associative meanings. Addressing the photographic representation as a metaphor rather than a document, Karapetian presents the image as a constructed object, and allows the artist’s labor to assert itself. As she explains, “I’ve long been attracted to the marks people make on architecture to express their concerns, in part because the marks I make through photogramming express mine.”
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Nate Klug's Rude Woods, Passages from Virgil's Eclogues, is forthcoming this summer as the third full-length book from The Song Cave. Recent poems have appeared in Harvard Divinity BulletinPoetry, Poetry NorthwestSea Ranch, and the Threepenny Review.
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Colin Koopman is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oregon. He is the author of Pragmatism as Transition (Columbia University Press, 2009) and Genealogy as Critique (Indiana University Press, 2013) as well as numerous essays.
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Joshua Kotin is Assistant Professor of English at Princeton University.
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Jonathan Kramnick is Professor of English at Johns Hopkins University and author most recently of Actions and Objects from Hobbes to Richardson (2010) as well as "Against Literary Darwinism" and "Literary Studies and Science," both in Critical Inquiry.
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Brandon Kreitler is the author of Late Frontier, selected by Major Jackson for the Poetry Society of America’s National Chapbook Fellowship, and the recipient of a Discovery / Boston Review Prize from the 92Y’s Unterberg Poetry Center. He lives in New York City and edits the email Practice Catalogue.
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Aaron Kunin is Associate Professor of English at Pomona College. He studies early modern literature and poetics, and he is writing a book entitled Character as Form. His books of poetry are published by Fence Books; the most recent is Cold Genius.
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Patricia L Lewy is an art and music historian. She holds a PhD in historical musicology from the University of California, Berkeley and has published articles and entries in Early Music, Cambridge Opera Journal, and New Grove Dictionary of Opera. She is currently completing her PhD in art history at the University of Essex (under Dawn Ades) and is Senior Contributing Writer for Post-War and Contemporary Art at Christie’s. A monograph, Friedel Dzubas: The Size of Life, is forthcoming from Artist Book Foundation in 2017.
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Walter L. Reed's primary field of interest is British Romanticism, but he has also written on the history and theory of the novel, literary theory in general (with particular attention to the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin), and on the Bible as literature and the relations of literature and religion. His current research deals with the construction of character in literature of the Romantic period and the theory and history of reading. Reed has published Dialogues of the Word: The Bible as Literature According to Bakhtin (Oxford University Press, 1993), An Exemplary History of the Novel: The Quixotic versus the Picaresque (University of Chicago Press, 1981), and Meditations on the Hero: A Study of the Romantic Hero in Nineteenth-Century Fiction (Yale University Press, 1974).
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Lancaster's research tries to understand how sexual mores, racial hierarchies, and class predicaments interact in a volatile world. His books include Life is Hard: Machismo, Danger, and the Intimacy of Power in Nicaragua, which received both the C. Wright Mills Award (Society for the Study of Social Problems) and the Ruth Benedict Prize (Society of Lesbian and Gay Anthropologists). He edited (with Micaela di Leonardo) The Gender/Sexuality Reader: Culture, History, Political Economy. His fifth and most recent book is Sex Panic and the Punitive State, which also won the Ruth Benedict Prize. It examines America's draconian sex offender laws and their production of ever-larger ranks of people who are subject to permanent social exclusion.
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Joshua Landy is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French, Professor of Comparative Literature, and co-director of the Literature and Philosophy Initiative at Stanford, home to major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. Professor Landy co-hosts the nationally syndicated radio show "Philosophy Talk." From 2013 to 2019, he was the director of the Structured Liberal Education program at Stanford. Landy is the author of Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust (Oxford, 2004) and of How To Do Things with Fictions (Oxford, 2012). He is also the co-editor of two volumes, Thematics: New Approaches (SUNY, 1995, with Claude Bremond and Thomas Pavel) and The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford, 2009, with Michael Saler).
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Willie Legette is Professor Emeritus in political science at South Carolina State University. His areas of specialization are American political development, particularly bearing on the South and on black Americans, social movements, and political theory.
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Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, alias Lenin (1870-1924), was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician, and political theorist.
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Ruth Leys is an Academy Professor at Johns Hopkins University, specializing in the history of the human sciences, with an emphasis on the genealogy of psychoanalysis, and the psychological, cognitive and neuro-sciences. Leys is the author of From Sympathy to Reflex: Marshall and His Critics (Harvard, 1991), Trauma: a Genealogy (Chicago, 2000), From Guilt to Shame: Asuchwitz and After (Princeton, 2007), The Ascent of Affect: Genealogy and Critique (Chicago, 2017), and editor of Defining American Psychology: The Correspondence Between Adolf Meyer and Edward Bradford Titchener (Johns Hopkins, 1991).
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A native of Kraków, Ewa Lipska has published over thirty volumes of poetry and has been translated into over a dozen languages. She made her début in 1967 with the critically acclaimed collection Poems, and since then has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Koscielski Fund, Robert Graves Pen Club, and the Gdynia Prize for Literature. She has served as Poland’s cultural representative in Austria and throughout the 1990s was Director of the Polish Cultural Institute in Vienna.
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Nicholas Liu lives in Singapore. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in magazines including elimae, Mantis, nthposition, Poetry Review, RHINO, and Stand. He is series editor of firstfruits publications’ Storm Glass chapbook series and a regular reviewer for Quarterly Literary Review Singapore. His first collection is Versions from the English (firstfruits, forthcoming 2011). He blogs at http://nicholasliu.wordpress.com/.
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Nancy Locke teaches in the Department of Art History at the Pennsylvania State University (University Park). The author of Manet and the Family Romance (Princeton, 2001), she contributed to the exhibition catalogue Manet, inventeur du Moderne (Paris: Musée d’Orsay, 2011); she has also published in edited volumes such as Perspectives on Manet, ed. Therese Dolan (Ashgate, 2012) and Manet’s Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe, ed. Paul Hayes Tucker (Cambridge, 1998). Her second book (in progress), Cézanne’s Shadows, explores Paul Cézanne’s engagement with the art of the past.
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Dominic Lopes is Distinguished University Scholar and Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of British Columbia. He works mainly in aesthetics and is a member of the UBC aesthetics group. His research focuses on pictorial representation and perception; the aesthetic and epistemic value of pictures, including scientific images; theories of art and its value; the ontology of art; computer art and new art forms; and aesthetic value, wherever it may be found. He is working on a book entitled Being for Beauty: Aesthetic Agency and Value, a collection of his essays that explore methodological innovation in aesthetics, and a paper co-authored with Diarmuid Costello on the work of photographer James Welling, as well as papers on aesthetic perception, aesthetic disagreement, and methodology in the philosophy of art. Paloma Atencia-Linares recently interviewed him in the Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics and Michel-Antoine Xhignesse interviewed him in ASAGE,
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Leslie Lopez specializes in labor education curriculum development at the Center for Labor Education and Research at the University of Hawai‘i–West O‘ahu, http://www.hawaii.edu/uhwo/clear/home/.
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Megan R. Luke is Associate Professor of art history at the University of Southern California. She is the author of Kurt Schwitters: Space, Image, Exile (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014), co-editor (with Sarah Hamill) of Photography and Sculpture: The Art Object in Reproduction (Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2017), and several essays, most recently, on Jackson Pollock, “Painting in the Round,” Getty Research Journal, no. 9, S1 (2017): 149–82.
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John Lysaker is Professor of Philosophy at Emory University. Drawing from the traditions of phenomenology, American romanticism, and critical social theory, he works in the philosophy of art, philosophical psychology, and political philosophy. His published work ranges from studies of Emerson to poetics to the nature of schizophrenia, all of which remain ongoing concerns. His current projects in the philosophy of art include a short volume on Brian Eno's "Music for Airports" and a treatise on the nature of art entitled "Dear Glaucon: Finding Our Bearings with the Work of Art."
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A graduate of the National College of Art and Design, Ireland, Margaret MacNamidhe teaches in the Department of Art History, Criticism, and Theory, at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the author of Delacroix's Forgotten World: The Origins of Romantic Painting (London: I.B. Tauris, 2015).
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ANTHONY MADRID lives in Victoria, Texas. His poems have appeared in Best American Poetry, Boston Review, Fence, Harvard Review, Lana Turner, LIT, and Poetry. He is the author of I Am Your Slave Now Do What I Say (Canarium, 2012) and Try Never (Canarium, 2017). His “children’s book for adults,” called There Was an Old Man with a Springbok, appeared in 2019 from Prelude Books.
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Theodore Martin is assistant professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. His work has appeared in Modern Language Quarterly and Novel, and is forthcoming in Postmodern/Postwar and After. He has just completed a book titled Contemporary Drift: Genre, Historicism, and the Problem of the Present.
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Francesco Marullo (1982) is an assistant professor at the UIC School of Architecture. He holds a Ph.D. history and theory of architecture from the Delft University of Technology and the Berlage Institute, and he is interested in the relations between architecture, labor, and the space of production. He is a founding member of the research collective The City as a Project, the think-tank Behemoth Press, Matteo Mannini Architects, and collaborated with the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, DOGMA, and the urban planning department of RomaTre University. His work was featured in numerous architectural publications (Log, Volume, OASE, San Rocco, Domus, Flat-Out, JAE, Counter-Signals) and international exhibitions such as the Venice Biennale, the Oslo Triennale, and the Lisbon Triennale. He coedited The Architecture of Logistics (2018), coauthored Tehran: Life within Walls (2018), and contributed to the recent volumes Work, Body, Leisure (2018), and Aesthetics and Poetics of Logistics (2019).
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Jesse Matz is professor of English at Kenyon College. He is the author of Literary Impressionism and Modernist Aesthetics, and his work on "modernist time ecology" can be found in journals including Narrative, Modernist Cultures, and Modernism/modernity.
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Patrick McCreless is Professor of Music at Yale University.  He has published on the operas of Wagner--including a monograph, Wagner's Siegfried:  Its Drama, Its History, and Its Music; and (with the literary scholar Adrian Daub) the articles on the Ring in the forthcoming  Cambridge Wagner Encyclopedia.   He has also published essays or book chapters on the theory and analysis of chromatic music in the nineteenth century; Schenkerian theory; rhetoric and music; musical gesture; the music of Shostakovich; and the history of music theory.
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Maureen N. McLane is the author of World Enough: poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010) and Same Life: poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008), as well as  two books of literary criticism, Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Romanticism and the Human Sciences (CUP, 2000).  Her book My Poets—in which criticism meets shadow memoir—will be published in June 2012 by FSG.
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William J. Mello is Associate Professor in the Department of Labor Studies, Indiana University, since 2003 and contributing faculty member in the Graduate History Program-MAHIS at the State University of Ceara –UECE (Brazil) since 2009. Some of his publications include: New York Longshoremen, Class and Power on the Docks (2010); Trabalhadores, Novas Perspectivas e Comparacoesed. William J Mello and T. Iverson (2010); Historia, Memoria, Oralidade e Cultura, ed. William J Mello, Zilda Lima and Altemar da Costa Muniz (2014); Historia, Memoria, Oralidade e Cultura, vol. II, ed. William J Mello, Zilda Lima and Altemar da Costa Muniz (forthcoming 2016); and Legionarios, “Galinhas Verdes” e o Trabalhadores no Brasil (1931-1940), ed. William J Mello (forthcoming 2016).
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Stephen Melville is Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at The Ohio State University and has most recently been Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Bard College. His publications include Philosophy Beside Itself: On Deconstruction and Modernism (1986), Seams: Art as a Philosophical Context (1996), As Painting: Division and Displacement, with Philip Armstrong and Laura Lisbon (2001), and Writing Art History; Disciplinary Departures, with Margaret Iversen (2010). He is currently at work on a book on Hegel and recent art.
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Walter Benn Michaels is professor of English at UIC. His most recent book is The Beauty of a Social Problem (Chicago, 2016). His other books include The Gold Standard and the Logic of Naturalism: American Literature at the Turn of the Century; Our America: Nativism, Modernism, and Pluralism; The Shape of the Signifier: 1967 to the End of History; and The Trouble with Diversity: How We Learned to Love Identity and Ignore Inequality.
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Eric Michaud is a Director of Studies at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.
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Ange Mlinko is the author of three books of poetry, including Shoulder Season (Coffee House, 2010) which was a finalist for the William Carlos Williams Award and the PEN Center USA Literary Award, and Starred Wire (Coffee House, 2005) which was chosen for the National Poetry Series and was a finalist for the James Laughlin Award. In 2009 the Poetry Foundation awarded her the Randall Jarrell Award for her criticism, which appears in Poetry, The Nation, and The London Review of Books. She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Houston.
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Toril Moi is James B. Duke professor of Literature and Romance Studies and Professor of English, Philosophy, and Theater Studies at Duke University. She also directs PAL, the Center for Philosophy, Arts, and Literature at Duke. She has published books on feminist theory, Simone de Beauvoir, and Henrik Ibsen and modernism. Her latest book is Revolution of the Ordinary.
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Richard Moran is Brian D. Young Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the author of Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge (Princeton, 2001), The Philosophical Imagination: Selected Essays (Oxford, 2017), and The Exchange of Words: Speech, Testimony, and Intersubjectivity (Oxford, 2018).
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Allison Morehead is Associate Professor of Art History and Cultural Studies, and the Coordinator for Graduate Studies in Art History at Queen's University, situated on traditional Anishnaabe and Haudenosaunee territories in Kingston, Canada. She has published extensively on transnational modern art, with a focus on fin-de-siècle French and Scandinavian symbolisms in dialogue with the psy-sciences and the medicalization of modern life, most recently in her book Nature's Experiments and the Search for Symbolist Form (Penn State University Press, 2017). She leads the international and interdisciplinary research group, Edvard Munch, Modernism, and Medicine, and she is working on a monograph entitled Gambling and the Modern Imaginary from which this essay stems.
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ALBERTO MOREIRAS is Professor of Hispanic Studies at Texas A&M University. He is the author of Línea de sombra. El no sujeto de lo politico (Palinodia, 2006), The Exhaustion of Difference: The Politics of Latin American Cultural Studies (Duke University Press, 2001), and Tercer espacio: Duelo y literatura en América Latina (ARCIS/LOM, 1999), among other books. His Piel de lobo: Posthegemonía e infrapolítica is forthcoming in Biblioteca Nueva, Madrid. He is a coeditor of the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Política común, and Res publica. Revista de filosofía política.
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Daniel Morgan is Associate Professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. He is author of Late Godard and the Possibilities of Cinema (University of California Press, 2012) and a number of articles on topics in the history of film theory, philosophical aesthetics, and nonfiction film.
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Professor of Philosophy and BOF Research Professor at the University of Antwerp. He is co-director of the Centre for Philosophical Psychology at the University. His research focuses on philosophy of mind, philosophy of biology and aesthetics.
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Richard Neer is David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Humanities, Art History and the College, and an affiliate of the Departments of Classics and Cinema & Media Studies. He is also Executive Editor of Critical Inquiry. He works on the intersection of aesthetics, archaeology and art history, with particular emphasis on Classical Greek and neo-Classical French art. His most recent books are The Emergence of the Classical Style in Greek Sculpture (University of Chicago Press, 2010) and The Art and Archaeology of the Greek World: A New History, 2000–100 BCE (Thames & Hudson, 2011). He has published on the politics of architectural sculpture in Greece, the history of connoisseurship, French painting and recent cinema.
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Karla Oeler is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies and a Core Faculty member of the Department of Comparative Literature at Emory University. She is the author of A Grammar of Murder: Violent Scenes and Film Form (University of Chicago Press, 2009). She is currently writing a book called The Surface of Things: Cinema and Interiority.
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Margaret Olin is a Senior Research Scholar at Yale University, with appointments at Yale Divinity School as well as in the Department of Religious Studies, the Program in Judaic Studies and the Department of the History of Art. From 1986 until her arrival at Yale in 2009 she was a professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the departments of Art History, Theory and Criticism, and Visual and Critical Studies. She is the author most recently of Touching Photographs (University of Chicago, 2012). She is also co-editor, with Robert S. Nelson, of Monuments and Memory, Made and Unmade (University of Chicago Press, 2003), and, with Steven Fine, Vivian B. Mann, and Maya Balakirsky-Katz co-edits the journal Images: A Journal of Jewish Art and Visual Culture. In 2012 she curated the multi-venue exhibition Shaping Community: Poetics and Politics of the Eruv at Yale University, to which she contributed the photographic installations “Urban Bricolage” and “No Carry Zone.”
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Jennifer W. Olmsted is associate professor of art history in the James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History at Wayne State University. She has published several essays on Delacroix's portraits and North African paintings, and she is completing a book on the politics of masculinity in Delacroix's Moroccan pictures. Her current project focuses on portraiture and bourgeois aesthetics in mid-nineteenth century France.
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Yi-Ping Ong is Assistant Professor of Comparative Thought and Literature at Johns Hopkins University. Her book The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy (Harvard University Press, 2018) received an Honorable Mention for the Thomas J. Wilson Prize, presented by Harvard University Press for an outstanding first book across the arts and sciences. Other work on the novel and on nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy and literature has appeared or is forthcoming in PMLA, Philosophy and Literature, Post45, Twentieth-Century Literature, and the Harvard Review.
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Anthony Opal is the author of ACTION (forthcoming from Punctum Books) and editor of The Economy. Recent poems can be found in Poetry, Notre Dame Review, Birdfeast, and elsewhere. He lives near Chicago with his wife and daughter.
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Magdalena Ostas works at the crossroads of literature, philosophy, and the arts. She has written on a range of figures at this intersection, including Kant, Wordsworth, Keats, Jane Austen, Nietzsche, Woolf, Wittgenstein, Stanley Cavell, Jeff Wall, and Michael Fried. Her essays have appeared in International Studies in Philosophy, symploke, Studies in Romanticism, and nonsite and in the collections Michael Fried and Philosophy (Routledge, 2018), Approaches to Teaching Jane Austen’s Persuasion (Modern Language Association, 2020), The Poetry of Emily Dickinson: Philosophical Perspectives (Oxford Studies in Philosophy and Literature, 2021), and Wittgenstein and Literary Studies (Cambridge University Press, 2021). She is currently at work on a book-length study about literature, art, and the interior lives of persons in the nineteenth century and after. She has taught at Rhode Island College, Boston University, and Florida Atlantic University.
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Charles Palermo's current research project is an account of monetary exchange as a metaphor for photography, from Peter Henry Emerson to the present. Modernism and Authority: Picasso and His Milieu around 1900 (2015) describes the crisis of authority in artistic representation around the turn of the twentieth century in the symbolist circle around the young Picasso and Apollinaire. Fixed Ecstasy: Joan Miró in the 1920s (2008) places Miró's work in relation to the emergence of surrealist automatism.
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Nikos Papastergiadis is Professor at the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. His current research focuses on the investigation of the historical transformation of contemporary art and cultural institutions by digital technology. His publications include Modernity as Exile (1993), Dialogues in the Diaspora (1998), The Turbulence of Migration (2000), Metaphor and Tension (2004), Spatial Aesthetics: Art Place and the Everyday (2006), Cosmopolitanism and Culture (2012) as well as being the author of numerous essays which have been translated into over a dozen languages and appeared in major catalogues such as the Biennales of Sydney, Liverpool, Istanbul, Gwanju, Taipei, Lyon, Thessaloniki and Documenta 13.
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Christian Parenti is an assistant clinical professor in New York University’s Global Liberal Studies Program. He has published four books, the most recent being, Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (Nation Books, 2011). Parenti has reported extensively from Afghanistan, Iraq, and various parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America; his articles have appeared in The Nation, Fortune, The London Review of Books, The New York Times, and Jacobin.
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Helen Petrovsky is head of the Department of Aesthetics at the Institute of Philosophy of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Her most recent book is Disturbance of the Sign: Culture against Transcendence (Vozmushchenie znaka: Kul’tura protiv transtsendentsii) (2019). She is also editor in chief of the theoretical and philosophical journal Sinii divan.
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Marina Pinsky is an artist currently living and working in Brussels, Belgium. Her photographs and sculptures have been exhibited nationally and internationally. At present, she is preparing for an exhibition at the Kunsthalle Basel and procrastinating by writing open letters.
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Piotr Piotrowski is Professor ordinarius in the Art History Department of Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland, which he chaired from 1999 to 2008. Research Fellow of the Graduate School for East and South-East European Studies, Ludwig-Maximillians-Universität, München/ Regensburg Universität. He also was the co-editor of the annual journal Artium Quaestiones (1994-2009), director of the National Museum in Warsaw (2009-2010), and Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the National Museum in Poznan (1992-1997). Visiting Professor at Humboldt University (2011-2012), Warsaw University (2011, 2012-2013), the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College USA (2001), and Hebrew University in Jerusalem (2003). He was a fellow at—among others—the Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts, Washington D.C. (1989-1990), Columbia University (1994), the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J. (2000), Collegium Budapest (2005-2006), and the Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Mass. (2009). He is the author of a dozen books including: Meanings of Modernism (Polish 1999, 2011), In the Shadow of Yalta. Art and the Avant-garde in Eastern Europe, (Polish 2005, English 2009, Croatian 2011), Art after Politics (Polish 2007), Art and Democracy in Post-Communist Europe (Polish 2010, English 2012), and Critical Museum (Polish 2011, Serbian 2013), as well as editor, co-editor and co-author of many others. For his scholarly achievements Piotrowski received among others the Jan Dlugosz Award (Krakow 2006), and the Igor Zabel Award for Culture and Theory (Barcelona 2010).
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Robert B. Pippin is the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought, the Department of Philosophy, and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books on German Idealism and related topics, including Hegel’s Idealism: The Satisfactions of Self–Consciousness, Idealism as Modernism: Hegelian Variations, and Modernism as a Philosophical Problem. He has also published essays on literature, and the book, Henry James and Modern Moral Life. His latest books are: Hegel’s Practical Philosophy: Rational Agency as Ethical Life (2008), Hollywood Westerns and American Myth (Yale University Press, 2010), Nietzsche, Psychology and First Philosophy (University of Chicago Press, 2010), Hegel on Self–Consciousness: Desire and Death in the Phenomenology of Spirit (Princeton University Press, 2011), Fatalism in American Film Noir: Some Cinematic Philosophy (University of Virginia Press, 2012), and After the Beautiful: Hegel and the Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism (University of Chicago Press, 2014).
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Nadya Pittendrigh lives in Victoria, Texas, where she teaches at the University of Houston-Victoria.
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Jonathan Poore is Instructor of Composition and Literature Rock Valley College.
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Alex Potts is Max Loehr Collegiate Professor in the Department of History of Art at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is author of the books Flesh and the Ideal. Winckelmann and the Origins of Art History (1994 and 2000), The Sculptural Imagination. Figurative, Modernist, Minimalist (2000), and most recently Experiments in Modern Realism: World Making, Politics and the Everyday in Postwar European and American Art (2013). He is currently working on a book on the picturing of the social in nineteenth-century art.
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Samuel Raybone is Lecturer in Art History at Aberystwyth University. His first monograph, Gustave Caillebotte as Worker, Collector, Painter, is forthcoming in 2019. His present research investigates ephemera and ephemerality in the culture of nineteenth-century French modernity.
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Dierdra Reber is Assistant Professor of Spanish at Emory University. She is the author of essays on Latin American film and fiction, post-dictatorial and post-revolutionary memory, and the epistemology of globalization. Her current book manuscript, Coming to Our Senses: Affect and an Order of Things for Global Culture (forthcoming, Columbia University Press), engages studies in Hispanism, film and media, affect, capitalism, and sustainability.
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Touré F. Reed is a professor of 20th Century US and African American History at Illinois State University. He is the author of Not Alms But Opportunity: The Urban League and the Politics of Racial Uplift, 1910-1950 (Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2008) and Toward Freedom: The Case Against Race Reductionism (Verso Books, 2020).
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Adolph Reed, Jr. is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Pennsylvania and an organizer with the Debs-Jones-Douglass Institute’s Medicare for All-South Carolina initiative. He’s currently completing a book, When Compromises Come Home to Roost: The Decline and Transformation of the U.S. Left for Verso and, with Kenneth W. Warren, You Can’t Get There from Here: Black Studies, Cultural Politics, and the Evasion of Inequality with Routledge. His other books include The Jesse Jackson Phenomenon: The Crisis of Purpose in Afro-American Politics; W.E.B. Du Bois and American Political Thought: Fabianism and the Color Line; Stirrings in the Jug: Black Politics in the Post-Segregation Era; Class Notes: Posing as Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene; and co-author with Kenneth W. Warren et al., Renewing Black Intellectual History: The Ideological and Material Foundations of African American Thought.
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Bernard Rhie is Associate Professor of English at Williams College, where he teaches courses on modern literature and on the connections between philosophy and literature. He is at work on a study of the significance of faces, face perception, and physiognomy in twentieth-century philosophy and critical theory, entitled The Philosophy of the Face in the 20th Century. He is also coeditor, with Richard Eldridge, of the recently published essay collection, Stanley Cavell and Literary Studies: Consequences of Skepticism, and the editor of the academic blog, OLP & Literary Studies Online
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Tadeusz Różewicz is widely considered to be the most influential postwar Polish poet. Winner of the 2000 NIKE prize, Poland's top literary prize, and the 2007 European Prize for Literature, he has published over twenty volumes of poetry, and is a major playwright, essayist, and fiction writer. Among his works available in English translation are The Survivor (Princeton UP, 1977), Recycling (Ark, 2001), New Poems (Archipelago, 2007), and Sobbing Superpower (Norton, 2011). Różewicz died on April 24, 2014 at the age of 92, and was laid to rest in the mountain village of Karpacz.
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Rebecca Roach is a Postdoctoral researcher at Kings College London, where she is examining digital life writing and literature. Prior to this she completed her doctorate at Oxford University in March 2014. Her thesis explored the interview as a form of literature from the latter half of the nineteenth century through to the present day, on both sides of the Atlantic. She has work forthcoming in Textual Practice and a collected volume of essays, Moving Modernisms, co-edited with Laura Marcus and David Bradshaw, will be published by OUP in 2015.
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Michael Robbins is the author of Alien vs. Predator, forthcoming from Penguin. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, Harper's, and several other journals. His book and music reviews appear frequently in the London Review of Books, Poetry, the Village Voice, and elsewhere. He is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Poetry at the University of Southern Mississippi.
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Sam Rose received his BA and PhD from the University of Cambridge and the Courtauld Institute of Art, and was a junior research fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge. His research and teaching is based around modern and contemporary art and art theory/aesthetics. Current research projects focus on the history of the idea of visual modernism (including in global perspective, and in relation to contemporary art), the roles and meanings of formalism in the visual arts, and present-day interactions between art history and aesthetics.
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James A. Russell is a professor of psychology at Boston College. He is a proponent of a research program on emotion known as the Psychological Constructionist View. He has researched concepts of emotion and their development, cultural differences in understanding facial expressions of emotion, and self-reported experiences of emotion.
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Emilio Sauri is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Boston. His research focuses on the relationship between Latin American literature and US fiction, and the relationship of each to a deepening crisis in the world economic system. He is co-editor of Literary Materialisms (Palgrave, 2013), and his work has appeared in MLN, Studies in American Fiction, and Twentieth-Century Literature. He is currently at work on a book project titled Combined and Uneven Americas: Literature, Capital, and the Ends of Modernization.
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James Schmidt, Professoer of Political Science at Boston University, specializes in European intellectual history and the history of political and social thought from the eighteenth century to the present. He is the author of Maurice Merleau-Ponty: Between Phenomenology and Structuralism (1985) and the editor of What is Enlightenment? Eighteenth-Century Answers and Twentieth-Century Questions (1996) and Theodor Adorno (2007) and co-editor, with Amelie Rorty, of the Critical Guide to Kant's Idea for a Universal History (2009). The recipient of a number of grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, he also received the James L. Clifford Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and was a Fellow at the Liguria Center for the Arts and Humanities.
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Michael Schreyach is Associate Professor of Art History at Trinity University, and has held a Terra Foundation Visiting Professorship at the JFK Institute for North American Studies at the Freie Universität in Berlin. His scholarly publications include Pollock’s Modernism as well as essays on Barnett Newman, Hans Hofmann, Cy Twombly, Anne Truitt, and the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. He is currently at work on a book project entitled Newman’s Totality.
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John Schwenkler (Twitter: @johnschwenkler) is Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University and the author of Anscombe's 'Intention': A Guide (Oxford, 2019). His research is in the philosophy of mind and action.
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John Seed lives in London and is the author of eleven collections of verse, most recently Smoke Rising: London 1940-41 (Shearsman, 2015) and Brandon Pithouse (Smokestack, 2016). He has also written a lot of history, a book on Marx and essays on the poetry of Basil Bunting, Bill Griffiths and George Oppen.
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Gary Shapiro is Tucker-Boatwright Professor in the Humanites and Philosophy, Emeritus at the University of Richmond. Previously he taught at the University of Kansas and has been visiting professor at the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) and Södertörn University (Stockholm). His books include Nietzschean Narratives (1989), Alcyone: Nietzsche on Gifts, Noise, and Women (1991), Earthwards: Robert Smithson and Art After Babel (1995), and Archaeologies of Vision: Foucault and Nietzsche on Seeing and Saying (2003). Shapiro is completing a book on Nietzsche’s political thought and has recently published articles on aesthetics, the philosophy of literature, and land art. website: https://sites.google.com/site/garyshapirophilosophy/
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Anna Shechtman is a PhD Candidate in English Literature and Film & Media Studies at Yale University. She is also the film editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books.
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Richard Shiff is Effie Marie Cain Regents Chair in Art at The University of Texas at Austin, where he directs the Center for the Study of Modernism.
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Susan Sidlauskas teaches the history and theory of Modern Art at Rutgers University. This essay on the medical portrait is a part of a larger study of Anglo-American patients’ photographs, c. 1885-1945. She is the author of Body, Place and Self in Nineteenth-Century Painting, Cézanne’s Other: The Portraits of Hortense, winner of the Robert Motherwell Book Prize from the Dedalus Foundation, and Striking Resemblance, with Donna Gustafson. She was a Guggenheim Fellow in 2014. She will be a Clark Fellow in Spring 2019, where she plans to complete her book, John Singer Sargent and the Physics of Touch.
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Susan L. Siegfried is Paul Mellon Senior Fellow, 2014-2015, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., and Denise Riley Collegiate Professor of the History of Art and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan. She is working on visual representations of fashion and costume in nineteenth-century Europe; other articles forthcoming from the project include “The Visual Culture of Fashion and the Classical Ideal in Post-Revolutionary France,” The Art Bulletin, March 2015, and “Vernet’s Ladies,” in Daniel Harkett and Katie Hornstein, eds., Horace Vernet and the Thresholds of Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture, University Press of New England, 2015.
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Agata Siemionow (1978) is a practicing architect and educator. She is the principal of a solo practice, a single-handed practice, but many of her projects are developed in collaboration with various architects across Europe (Belgium, Italy, Israel, Switzerland, and the Netherlands) and the Americas. Her built work includes single and multifamily houses and interior renovations. Her designs have received recognition, among them a second prize at Europan 8 and honorable mention at Europan 9. Her work has been published in Project Russia and Bauwelt, among others publications, and exhibited in Venice (at the 2006 Biennale), Berlin, Moscow, and Warsaw. She collaborated on the publication Brussels a Manifesto. Towards the Capital of Europe (NAi, 2007) and is an editor of Crown Hall Dean's Dialogues 2012–2017 (Actar, 2017).
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Kaja Silverman is the Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Professor of Contemporary Art, and the author of eight books: Flesh of My Flesh (2009); James Coleman (2002); World Spectators (2000); Speaking About Godard (with Harun Farocki, 1998); The Threshold of the Visible World (1996); Male Subjectivity at the Margins (1992); The Acoustic Mirror; The Female Voice in Psychoanalysis and Cinema (1988); and The Subject of Semiotics (1983). Silverman’s current writing and teaching are focused primarily on photography, time-based visual art and painting. She is working on two books about photography: “The Miracle of Analogy,” and “The Promise of Social Happiness.” In “The Miracle of Analogy,” Silverman argues that photography is as old as human civilization, and that it is the world’s primary way of showing itself to us. In “The Promise of Social Happiness” she addresses the form photography has recently assumed: large-format digital and analogue images, that are exhibited in museums instead of books, magazines, and private spaces.
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André Singer is Professor of Political Science at the University of São Paulo. He was Press Secretary for the Palácio do Planalto from 2005-2007 and, from 2003-2007, spokesperson for President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. His books include Esquerda e direita no eleitorado brasileiro (EdUSP, 1999), Os Sentidos do Lulismo (Companhia das Letras, 2012), and O Lulismo em crise (Companhia das Letras, forthcoming).
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Lisa Siraganian is Associate Professor and J. R. Herbert Boone Chair in Humanities, Department Chair at The Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of Modernism’s Other Work: The Art Object’s Political Life (New York: Oxford UP, 2012), shortlisted for the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize (2013).
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Slaboda's research interests are rooted in a broad and longstanding fascination with the history of religion in America. His focus has narrowed in recent years to the political dimensions of religious institutions, movements and ideas since the second half of the 20th century. He is especially interested in how Christians, their congregations and organizations contributed to the political culture of American cities. His dissertation research takes the ministry of Paul Washington and the Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia from 1962-1987 as a point of departure for a history of the development of black politics in Philadelphia during that period.
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Marcie Smith teaches in the department of economics at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. She has a J.D. from the University of North Carolina School of Law.
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Preston Smith II specializes in postwar black politics with an emphasis on housing and class. Inner-city neighborhood revitalization including economic development, affordable housing, quality public education, and equal and adequate delivery of municipal services.
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Davis Smith-Brecheisen lives, works, and teaches in Chicago where he researches and writes about modernism, the history of the novel, and the history of economic thought. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in ASAP/Journal, Los Angeles Review of Books, Studies in American Fiction, Mediations, nonsite.org, and Jacobin.
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Robert Somol has been the Director of the School of Architecture since 2007. A design critic and theorist, he is the editor of Autonomy and Ideology and has served on the editorial boards of Any and Log. His writings have appeared in publications ranging from Assemblage to Wired, and will appear in his collection of essays, Nothing to Declare. Somol is the co-designer of off-use, an award-winning studio and residence in Los Angeles that extends his interest in combining the speculative discipline of modernism with the material excesses of mass culture. For the 2015-16 academic year, Somol has been named a Fellow at UIC’s Institute for the Humanities completing his book manuscript, This Will Cover That: Writing and Building from the Death of Corbusier to the End of Architecture, and will serve as the Baumer Distinguished Visiting Co-Professor (along with Neil Denari) at the Ohio State University.
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Samir Sonti is a graduate student in history at the University of California, Santa Barbara and is a member of UAW Local 2865.
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Jan Sowa (born 1976) is a materialist dialectical social theorist and researcher. He studied at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland and University Paris VIII in Saint-Denis, France. He holds a PhD in sociology and a habilitation in cultural studies. His research and teaching assignments have taken him to several universities in Poland and abroad, recently, University of São Paulo, Warsaw University and Akademie der Künste der Welt in Cologne. He is a member of the Committee on Cultural Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences.
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G. Gabrielle Starr is Professor of English and Seryl Kushner Dean of the College of Arts and Science at New York University. She is the author, most recently, of Feeling Beauty: The Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience (MIT Press, 2013), and "Aesthetics and Taste: The Beautiful, the Sublime, and Beyond in the Eighteenth Century” (in A Companion to British Literature: Volume III: Long Eighteenth-Century Literature 1660-1837, ed. Robert DeMaria, Jr., Heesok Chang, and Samantha Zacher, Blackwell, 2014); she is also co-author, along with Edward A. Vessel and Nava Rubin, of "The Brain on Art: Intense Aesthetic Experience Activates the Default Mode Network,” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:66 (2012).
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Henry Staten studied Wittgenstein intensively with Oets (O.K.) Bouwsma, who had been a member of Wittgenstein's personal circle. Subsequently, in Wittgenstein and Derrida (1984) and later publications, he has tried to build bridges between anglo-American and continental philosophy. His most recent book is Techne Theory: A New Language for Art (2019).
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Judith Stein (17 April 1940–8 May 2017) was an American historian, and a Distinguished Professor of History at the City College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She worked on African American history, social movements, labor and business history, and political economy. Her major works are World of Marcus Garvey: Race and Class in Modern Society, Running Steel, Running America: Race, Economy and the Decline of Liberalism, and Pivotal Decade: How the United States Traded Factories for Finance.
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Samuel Steinberg's research and teaching engage modern and contemporary Latin American literature and visual culture, as well as critical theory and political thought. His recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in Revista Hispánica Moderna, Third Text, and CR: New Centennial Review. His book, Photopoetics at Tlatelolco, is forthcoming with University of Texas Press.
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Blake Stimson has written for Art Journal, Art Bulletin, Artforum, October, Texte zur Kunst, Oxford Art Journal, Third Text, New Left Review, Tate Papers, Études photographiques, Philosophy and Photography, and Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, among others and his work has been translated into French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Polish, Serbian, Chinese and Korean. He is the author The Pivot of the World: Photography and Its Nation and Citizen Warhol and co-editor of five volumes that focus on various junctures of art and political subjectivity. He is currently working on two books: one to be titled Guilt as Form that argues for a counter-genealogy of contemporary art arising from the turmoil of 1968, and another, Photography and God that focuses on the lost political aesthetic of photographer Paul Strand.
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Tracy B. Strong is Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at the University of Southampton and UCSD Distinguished Professor, emeritus, at the University of California, San Diego.  He is the editor or author of eleven books, most recently Politics without Vision: 'Thinking  without a Banister' in the Twentieth Century, and of many articles.  He is presently finishing a book on changing conceptions of American citizenship,  writing another on XIXth century American literature and political theory, and trying to say something truthful about music, art and political thought.
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Trevor Strunk is an Adunct Professor at DeSales University and the author and host of No Cartridge Audio, an aesthetic perspective on videogames. Beyond digital literatures, he focuses on 20th and 21st Century American Literature and has work forthcoming in Criticism and electronic book review. His current work attempting to broaden the scope of cultural and art historical relevance in literary-games criticism can be found online at no-cartridge.com and on iTunes.
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David Summers is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Art Theory and Italian Renaissance Art at the University of Virginia. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1996. Summers is generally regarded as an expert on Renaissance art and a notable figure in the field of art historical research. Amongst his main contributions to art history is the influential book Real Spaces.
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Richard Taws is Reader in the History of Art Department at University College London. He is the author of The Politics of the Provisional: Art and Ephemera in Revolutionary France (Penn State University Press, 2013). He is currently writing a book on the visual culture of telegraphy in nineteenth-century France and editing, with Genevieve Warwick, a forthcoming special issue of Art History on art and technology in early modern Europe.
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Joanna Trzeciak is Associate Professor of Russian and Translation Studies at Kent State University. She is currently on a Fulbright Fellowship at Jagiellonian University in Kraków. Her translations of Polish and Russian literature have appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Times Literary Supplement, Harpers, The Atlantic, Paris Review, Field, and New Ohio Review, among others. Sobbing Superpower: Selected Poems of Tadeusz Różewicz (W.W. Norton, 2011) was shortlisted for the Griffin Prize, and received the Found in Translation Award and the AATSEEL Award for Best Scholarly Translation.
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Blakey Vermeule's research interests are cognitive and evolutionary approaches to literature, Philosophy and literature, British literature from 1660-1820, post-Colonial fiction, satire, and the history of the novel. She is the author of The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain (2000) and Why Do We Care About Literary Characters? (2009), both from The Johns Hopkins University Press. She is currently working on a book about narrative and the conceptual unconscious.
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Marina Vishmidt is a writer and editor. She teaches at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her work has appeared in South Atlantic Quarterly, Artforum, Afterall, Journal of Cultural Economy, e-flux journal, Australian Feminist Studies, and Radical Philosophy, among others, as well as a number of edited volumes. She is the co-author of Reproducing Autonomy (with Kerstin Stakemeier) (Mute, 2016), and the author of Speculation as a Mode of Production: Forms of Value Subjectivity in Art and Capital (Brill 2018 / Haymarket 2019). She is one of the organisers of the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought at Goldsmiths, a member of the Marxism in Culture collective and is on the board of the New Perspectives on the Critical Theory of Society series (Bloomsbury Academic).
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Dorothea von Mücke is Professor of Germanic Studies at Columbia University. Her books include Virtue and the Veil of Illusion: Generic Innovation and the Pedagogical Project in Eighteenth-Century Literature (Stanford U.P., 1991); with Veronica Kelly, Body and Text in the Eighteenth Century (Stanford U.P., 1994); and The Seduction of the Occult and the Rise of the Fantastic Tale (Stanford, 2003).
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Molly Warnock is assistant professor of contemporary art history at Emory University. In 2010, she curated a double exhibition of the work of Simon Hantaï for the Galerie Jean Fournier, Paris, and the Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, and wrote the accompanying catalogue, Simon Hantaï (2010). Her Penser la Peinture: Simon Hantaï (2012) has just appeared in Gallimard’s Art et Artistes collection.
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Kenneth Warren specializes in African-American literature and 19th- and 20th-century American literature and critical theory. His work has ranged from studying such major 20th-century writers as Leon Forrest and Ralph Ellison to such 19th-century critics as William Dean Howells. Warren is a member of the editorial boards of the Cambridge Series of American Literature and American Literary History. He is the author of So Black and Blue: Ralph Ellison and the Occasion of Criticism (University of Chicago Press, 2003) and Black and White Strangers: Race and American Literary Realism (University of Chicago Press, 1993).
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Alex Weintraub is a PhD candidate in Columbia University's Department of Art History and Archaeology. He is currently at work on his dissertation, “Authoring Art in Nineteenth-Century France,” which explores how a group of ambitious painters and writers—Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, Eugène Delacroix, Victor Hugo, Vincent Van Gogh, and Émile Zola—confronted period concerns surrounding art's authorship in their secondary practices. His research has been supported by the Netherland-America Foundation, the Fulbright Program, and the Georges Lurcy Charitable and Educational Trust. Alongside his art historical writing, Alex regularly contributes to the Los Angeles Review of Books as a film critic.
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James Welling's books include Glass House (2011); Light Sources published by Steidl/Mack (2011); Flowers (2006); Photographs 1974-99 (2000); Wolfsburg (1994); Usines de Dentelle (1993); and Les Voies Ferrées/St. Etienne et La Plaine du Forez (1990). In 2004, Welling produced the feature film Easy which screened in Dramatic Competition at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival.
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Margaret Werth is the author of The Joy of Life: The Idyllic in French Art, circa 1900, and articles on Matisse, Picasso, Redon, and the city film, among others. She is currently completing a book on Manet in the 1870s that explores his work in relation to Mallarmé and Impressionism. An article related to this project, “A Laughter of the Look: Manet, Mallarmé, Polichinelle, and the Salon Jury in 1874,” is included in Is Paris Still the Capital of the Nineteenth Century? Essays on Art and Modernity, 1850-1900. She is Associate Professor of art history at the University of Delaware.
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Samuel C. Wheeler III is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut. He has written on philosophy of language, literary theory, metaphysics, political philosophy, ancient philosophy, and Derrida. In 2000, Stanford University Press published his Deconstruction as Analytic Philosophy. He is currently finishing a book on Davidson in relation to contemporary metaphysics. Since 1970, he has been a firefighter/EMT or officer in Willington, Connecticut volunteer fire departments.
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Brendan White lives in Oakland, California, and works in the Municipal Finance department of a large investment bank.
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Woodruff’s research focuses on modern and contemporary art in France with particular interest in its transnational dialogues and interdisciplinary influences. Her manuscript in process, Disordering the Establishment: Art, Display, and Participation in France, 1958-81, examines conceptual, kinetic, and media-based art designed to subvert normalizing institutions during a period of economic affluence, political conservatism, and social upheaval. She is currently writing articles on André Cadere and the Collectif d’Art Sociologique, and her article on the Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel will appear in the Fall 2014 issue of Art Journal.
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Daniel Worden is associate professor in the Department of English at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Masculine Style: The American West and Literary Modernism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011; paperback edition, 2013), which received the Thomas J. Lyon Book Award in Western American Literary and Cultural Studies. He is also the coeditor of Oil Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) and the editor of The Comics of Joe Sacco: Journalism in a Visual World (University Press of Mississippi, 2015). He is currently completing a book about literary journalism, the politics of the personal, and privatization, an article from which is forthcoming in American Literature.
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Joanna Wuest is a political scientist who studies the politics of identity and inequality. At Princeton University, she holds the Fund for Reunion-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellowship in LGBT Studies in the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts. Her previously published work has appeared in Politics & Gender and the Philadelphia Inquirer. Her current book project, Born This Way: Science and Citizenship in the American LGBTQ Movement, is a comprehensive account of the legal, political, and scientific forces that have produced bioessentialist renderings of sexual and gender identities.
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Marnin Young is Associate Professor of Art History at Stern College for Women, Yeshiva University. He has published articles and reviews on nineteenth-century French art in The Art Bulletin, Art History, Critical Inquiry, Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide, and the RIHA Journal. He is the author of Realism in the Age of Impressionism: Painting and the Politics of Time (Yale University Press, 2015). His current research focuses on space in and around Post-Impressionist painting.
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Daniel Zamora is a PhD student in sociology at the Free Universty of Brussels (ULB) specializing in Welfare policies under neo-liberalism. He works at the Group for research on Ethnic Relations, Migration & Equality (GERME). His doctoral dissertation concerns unemployment and poverty in Europe since the 1970s. He is also the co-editor of the journal Radical.
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